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1 hours ago
Topic:
Blue Water Engine Spares Recommendations?

Dick
Posts: 271
Hi Graham,
In addition to belts, filters, impellors, oil etc., the big-ticket items I carried for wandering far afield for my 4JH5e included (from memory) sending units and sensors (they are small), water pumps, raw and coolant, starter motor, fuel pump. My thinking on the latter, was these were items that could stop the engine rather than items where you could limp along till you could get help.
I keep my fuel clean through polishing and good filtering, so I did not include injectors or a high-pressure pump.
I also bought a set of gaskets and all the hoses with pre-bend and made sure I could cobble together from spares other hose sizes that exist.
I had upgraded the alternator when I installed the engine and have the original (came with engine) as a spare with the different size belt it would need. I also carry a spare external regulator.
That about covers it: one last thing. I would suggest swapping out pumps etc. under the watchful eye of a mechanic, putting the new ones on and the old but still good one in spares (with appropriate gaskets and fittings). That way there will be fewer surprises when the time comes to do it in some remote anchorage.
I will be interested in what others suggest,
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy
21 hours ago
Topic:
CREW AVAILABLE

Steve Brown
Posts: 9
Steve Brown
Posts: 9
Topic: CREW AVAILABLE
I have recently had two Russian friends crew for me on the 1750nm leg from Salvador in Brazil to French Guyana and then stay on with my wife and I while we explored the rivers of FG, Surinam and Guyana before sailing on to Grenada.
Both have sailing qualifications, know their way around a boat and are good watch keepers.
They work hard to keep the boat clean and in good order both inside and out.
Slava is a good mechanic and is quick and eager to learn while Olga is an excellent cook.
Their more recent exploits have seen them cross the Atlantic on a 34ft Tartan in the 2016 ARC+, backpack over 45,000kms around South America and sail to the Falklands on a 60ft Catamaran and return on a 56ft Classic Ketch.

They are now looking after Novara in Grenada while they look for a boat to cross first to Panama and then help them realise their dream of sailing across the Pacific.
I can recommend them to anyone looking for crew and if interested please contact me at novara@mailasail.com
edited by novara on 9/18/2018
1 days ago
Topic:
Blue Water Engine Spares Recommendations?

Janaki Lennie
Posts: 1
We are trying to put together a sensible list of engine spares for a Pacific crossing. The engine is a Yanmar 4JH4AE with about 800hrs.
The boat is not huge so we need to find the right balance between safety and excess.
Our assumption is that you can ship anything anywhere if you are willing to wait long enough so we want to focus on stuff that is a) more likely to fail and b) can be fixed at sea.
Has anyone made such a list or can make recommendations?

Thanks a lot!

Graham
SV Leela
Bristol 38.8
1 days ago
Topic:
Coppercoat and other epoxy / copper antifouling

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Five years on and we are very pleased especially as for 3 of those years the boat was continually in the water with no lift and scrub facilities. We hauled out last week and have a clean hull. The coppercoat is looking a bit patchy especially near the waterline where it has been gouged by ice. Tomorrow we are going to give it a light sanding and then a few more top-up coats.
2 days ago
Topic:
Spruce notes on Alaska anchorages 2018

Fluenta
Posts: 2
Hello Simon,

I missed that subtly on who actually produced the document. Lots to learn about the Japan and Alaska phases of the trip.

We have not produced any proper cruiser guide type info but we did keep the blog up during our trip from Fiji to the Marshalls via Tuvalu and Kiribati. It starts at: http://sv-fluenta.blogspot.com/2016/11/enroute-tuvalu-under-super-moon.html. The website from the local yacht in Majuro has lots of information on-line and the cruising expats there, especially SV SEAL, are very helpful. I have various old references I am happy to share as well. Hopefully we will see you up there. Feel free to send any questions our way too.


Good to hear about the PO in Guam. We always forgot to look up the Port Officers and usually think about looking them up after we have left ! Although we have been OCC members for a few years we have attended a grand total of one OCC event as we are usually are on the move.


Presently in Tonga getting ready to hop to Fiji.

Cheers,

Max
SY Fluenta
2 days ago
Topic:
Coppercoat and other epoxy / copper antifouling

Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 154
Simon, How's your Coppercoat holding up?
2 days ago
Topic:
Sinking in NWP 2018

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Topic: Sinking in NWP 2018
Bill
Bob tells me, although he may be pulling my leg, that he has never heard of KAP files, forward looking sonar or Antares Charts. I wonder if an article on technological enhancements to assist in Navigation might be a good place to start with the new mentorship part of the Forum?
2 days ago
Topic:
Sinking in NWP 2018

Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 154
Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 154
Topic: Sinking in NWP 2018
Simon Currin wrote:
Bill,
I’m curious. When your boat got struck by lightning did all your various GPS devices get taken out?



All those on the boat got taken out yes - but we weren't on it - so I was able to navigate down to Newport with the iPhone. (Familiar territory, so no issues.)

Normally, when we hear thunder nearby, we put phone and iPad into the oven - not a perfect Faraday cage - but hopefully good enough!
2 days ago
Topic:
Sinking in NWP 2018

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Topic: Sinking in NWP 2018
Bill,
I’m curious. When your boat got struck by lightning did all your various GPS devices get taken out?

Apart from lightning it is hard to imagine the circumstance that would give rise to total GPS failure now that GLONASS and Galileo are coming on stream. The tally of GPS devices on our boat is 7 I think when smartphones, satellite phones and tablets are taken into account.

Sailing without accurate charts does, however, add to the ’adventure’ of sailing off piste. Despite lots of surveying activity by defence interests some areas of the world have had few updates to charts drawn half a century or more ago.

Mentorship should include learning to get the best out of KAP files, accessing satellite images of ice conditions in real-time and figuring out how to navigate beyond the limits of our charts. A better use time I think than rediscovering Astro - unless, of course that’s your passion!

Simon
3 days ago
Topic:
Spruce notes on Alaska anchorages 2018

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Max
I posted these Cruising notes (Japan and Alaska) on behalf of Andy and Sue Wareham who did not have sufficient bandwidth to post it themselves so sorry I can’t answer your query on the Japan / Aleutian passage.

If going to Guam be sure to look up our new and very enthusiastic Port Officer there.

We are hoping to follow the same route too in due course. It would be fascinating to get some cruising information on the Marshall Islands if you have created any.

Simon
3 days ago
Topic:
Falmouth to Tromso 2017

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Topic: Falmouth to Tromso 2017
Thank you I have placed links to your blog from Basque Country and Tromso on the OCC Cruising Information Map.
SimonLawrence.Stabbins wrote:
Arctic Circle -but not really Arctic --We We sailed from Falmouth to Tromso in our Pacific Seacraft Crealock 37 'Tern' via Shetland, Fair Isle and the Norwegian coast from Bergen north including the Lofotens and Vesteralen (and all the way back) in 2017. Full account at https://www.sailblogs.com/member/tern/422132
Larry and Manice Stabbins

edited by simoncurrin on 9/16/2018
3 days ago
Topic:
Sinking in NWP 2018

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Topic: Sinking in NWP 2018
Posted on behalf of Bob Shepton

Well done Bill for taking on the mentoring of the OCC Forum. Of course I would be willing to share any ill gained knowledge I may have acquired over the years, in spite of the flattery - which will get you everywhere!
But you have started with a corker of a question to which there is no easy answer as far as I can see. No GPS, wow, how quickly we came to rely on it. OK let’s start at the beginning. If you are coastal or offshore sailing and can observe any identifiable land or sea mark then as you will know you can take a bearing with a handheld compass, work out the back bearing and plot it on a chart. Ideally two or three identifiable marks with back bearings to form a cocked hat or triangle and you are in the middle. Or there are a lot of clever running fixes from just one mark and back bearing ably described by Tom Cunliffe in his many books on navigation.
But if you are out in the oceans this is no good at all, except in so far as you can keep a detailed log of courses steered from your last proper fix, at what speed and for how long (to gauge distance run,) and plot this daily on your chart. The longer that goes on for the less accurate your plotted position will be, but hey, if you’re crossing the Atlantic for instance you are bound to hit something the far side. Christopher Columbus was daring but not that clever…..!
But if you want to know your proper position, and most of us do, and there Is no GPS, I can see no alternative but to learn the rudiments of astro navigation. At least carry a sextant, even a cheap one unless you are concerned to have a really accurate fix in which case you must shell out hard cash, and the books describing how to do it. One year returning from the Azores in the days of Sat. Nav. before proper GPS, which gave you a position by Lat and Long approximately every three quarters of an hour, it suddenly went off. Panic! I had not done any astro for three or four years and had forgotten it all – my maths was always suspect. So a hurried reading of the books for revision and the taking of sun shots – the easiest shot to take – and working out of positions crossing with position lines from later sun shots. Fortunately two days later when somebody switched the Sat. Nav. back on again our plotted position was quite close to what the Sat. Nav. said.
If you do go down the astro path, don’t panic! Our very first astro shot ‘in anger’ ,for real, on the way down to the Azores some years previously, had placed us sixty miles inside Spain. We managed to sort it out (it was a deck watch error) and we did make it to Ponta Delgada and Horta… So get out there, turn the GPS off, take you sun or star shot and work it out. Maybe do it for two or three days, and then turn your GPS back on to see how you have done!
Incidentally I have always found learning the two formulas which you can use on a scientific calculator for finding ‘z’ and ‘hc’ etc much easier than carrying the bulky air navigation tables. I don’t really understand what Sin, Cos etc mean, but it works……we did our ‘First School to sail Across the Atlantic and Back’ by astro alone, and we even hit the places we were aiming for - Portland UK to Portland (Maine) USA, and back! It’s hard work in a gale of which there were a lot, but it worked……
4 days ago
Topic:
Atlantic France and North coast of Spain 2018

Lawrence.Stabbins
Posts: 4
In 2018 we sailed the Atlantic coast of France to the Basque Region and then the north coast to Cabo Ortegal in our Pacific Seacraft Crealock 37 'Tern'. Full account at https://www.sailblogs.com/member/tern/442293
Larry and Manice Stabbins
4 days ago
Topic:
Falmouth to Tromso 2017

Lawrence.Stabbins
Posts: 4
Arctic Circle -but not really Arctic --We We sailed from Falmouth to Tromso in our Pacific Seacraft Crealock 37 'Tern' via Shetland, Fair Isle and the Norwegian coast from Bergen north including the Lofotens and Vesteralen (and all the way back) in 2017. Full account at https://www.sailblogs.com/member/tern/422132
Larry and Manice Stabbins
4 days ago
Topic:
Tern's Travels Falmouth to Tromso 2017

Lawrence.Stabbins
Posts: 4
We sailed from Falmouth to Tromso in our Pacific Seacraft Crealock 37 'Tern' via Shetland, Fair Isle and the Norwegian coast from Bergen north including the Lofotens and Vesteralen (and all the way back) in 2017. Full account at https://www.sailblogs.com/member/tern/422132
Larry and Manice Stabbins
4 days ago
Topic:
Morocco from Cruising Information Community

Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 154
Posted on behalf of Kris Adams



Tangier. For members information. We just spend 5 nights in the new Tangier Bay Marina. The welcome was extraordinary with 3 men to catch our lines. There is a big fuel dock just before the arrival pontoon. The Arrival Pontoon around to the right has nice big cleats but its higher than normal docks so fenders up. The office conducts arrival and berthing details and the Customs and Immigration office is adjacent. All the facilities are new. Arrival formalities took approximate
ly half an hour. The new town is to the east as you leave the marina precinct and the Medina souk Kasbar is to the right for various entrances. We found many spoke good English. Especially the dock staff. Physical security on the docks is lacking as its easy to climb but there are a lot of guards and the public is not allowed down on the waterfront where the boats are docked. We paid €20 per night inclusive. The bathrooms although new have a few design issues but nothing more than many marina bathrooms! The only downside is that the marina is Med mooring and it might be tight when its full but right now there were only 9 yachts and a few power boats. Over 200 berths available. We got a hammerhead so we were happy. Dock water is pottable. Taxis are cheap. The marina has several good restaurants and a patisserie along its upstairs waterfront. I have a ubiquity Bullet high gain antenna and was able to receive good internet aboard. We will definitely be going back. Thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience. Oh and clearing out, you go to the arrival pontoon and finalize formalities. This took 10 minutes.
edited by bbalme on 9/15/2018
5 days ago
Topic:
Sinking in NWP 2018

Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 154
Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 154
Topic: Sinking in NWP 2018
Mea Cupla I guess! I am one of those that only started sailing relatively recently and if they turned off the GPS system I'd be in a world of hurt!

I can plot a GPS position on a chart - but I'd be very slow at it. So much so, I basically rely on electronic charts. Despite that, my paper charts pile seems to keep on growing - but I don't rely on those charts for at-the-moment navigation - more for planning.

In the US where I learned to sail, Yachtmaster type courses are simply not available (except online, making the practical side rather complex!) - and sailors are not required to take anything but the most basic boating safety course (I don't think even that is mandatory). When we sailed to the UK I was immediately impressed by the depth of knowledge of the average sailor - it certainly highlights a deficiency in my own training.


I have recently taken on responsibility for the OCC Forum and one aspect that I will be concentrating on is mentoring - an area of the Forum where people can ask dumb questions without getting ridiculed and where hopefully our experienced sailors will offer up nuggets of wisdom that the whole group can benefit from. I hope Bob, that you'd be a willing participant in sharing your undoubted wealth of knowledge and encouraging our less experienced Associate Members gain their OCC wings. Perhaps yo'd like to start with outlining exactly how you would advise people practice without the use of GPS - what would be the exercises you would want to see completed?
6 days ago
Topic:
Spruce notes on Alaska anchorages 2018

Fluenta
Posts: 2
Simon Currin wrote:
Spruce notes on Alaska anchorages visited June to Aug 2018 (Ground Tackle is 35Kg (30Kg plus extra lead inserted after last re-galvanising) Spade Anchor with 10mm chain)

See also the RCC Alaska Guide downloadable free from the internet.

Aleutians:
Attu: 52 48.490N: 173 09.845E between 4.1m & 5.3m at CD as we swung about, good holding & sheltered. Also anchored at 52 48.988 N:173 10.042E in 4.6m n sand/mud when wind went NE.

Kiska-Gertrude Cove: 51 55.896 N:177 27.262 E in 8.5m, good holding, well protected from Pacific swell from south and east, plenty of room, some boats have even anchored inside the wreck of the old Japanese freighter wreck.

Also just across the isthmus is Jeff Cove, a boat we know anchored in there in 2015 in westerly weather at 51 55.801N:177 28.694E.

Channels/Passes General Info!!! The passes near Little Kiska to get around to the main eastern harbour can be difficult in spring tides or with big currents between Pacific & Bering Sea. The usual wisdom is the ebb flows south and flood north, but there can be an offset of up to 2.5hrs on some passes from our experience. In general near the mountains on high islands, when the f'cast is 20kn and above, wind acceleration zones can be significantly higher, we have had 40-50kn in those situations,..so we are treating region with enormous respect when to leeward of high land.

Little Sitkin :51 57.367 N 178 27.626 E anchored in north wind, some swell entered harbour, jist untenable, if any west in wind would be untenable.

!!!Semisopochnoi Island - Beautiful views as we passed but there were horrendous squalls to leeward of the island. We had 50kn gusts in a 25kn forecast and sustained periods of gale force (mid 30s knots). Strong variable currents during spring tides (2-3kn) with wind against current and with the current during the few hours we were passing.

Kanaga: 51 42.9718 N:177 12.2487 W in 8.4m at CD sheltered.

ADAK: No Issues in Adak, no harbour master, fuel taken from fuel truck in small boat harbour at (Jun 2018) $3.45/US Gallon, berthing in smallboat hbr is free. Call "Cal" at Fuel Dock on VHF Ch 9 to arrange fuel. Don't leave boat open there are rats along dock.

Bechevin Bay 52 01.971N 175 07.463W Site of B24 crashed Liberator WW2 plane. Wind NW so some swell cam in but good anchorage

!!! Four Mountain Island was reported by a commercial fishing boat as a terrible place to pass to leeward in strong winds...expect at least 25kn more than the f'cast wind strength. We stayed 7M upwind in Bering Sea so did not test info. This view of Four Mountains was confimred by two other fishing boat skippers we later met !!!

Hot Springs cove, pos is 53 15.394N 168 22.081W we had 50+kn squalls from SE through to E and we held well in sand/mud in 9m depth,

Mailbox cove beside Mutton Cove pos 53 23.491N 167 32.370W nice & sheltered in SW. If it blew from N there is shelter in Mutton cove itself farther into inlet.

Dutch Harbor small boat harbour at 53 52.594N:166 33.042W approx $18/night plus electricity...that has a $7.50 meter read fee plus $0.50/kWhr

Alaskan Peninsula:
Bear Bay .. 55 10.505 N:162 00.818 W 8.7m at CD, bottom felt Stony but anchor held ok. No bears in bay but saw bears on headland to the south.

Volcano Bay .. 12.1 m at CD 55 13.707N 162 01.572W Thick clay and shingle superb holding, had 55kn willawaws from W-NW, probably more gusty here due to mountains than at Bear Bay. Saw bears here in the river shallows.

Zachary Bay at 55 21.821N 160 37.856W in 16.7m at CD, on a ledge that seems to be fairly level with what feels like a mud bottom. Seems good holding but only 20kn wind to test.Sea otters in bay.

Sand Point is good to stop..$23/night. Fuel at fish plant $2.97/gall.

Kupreanof Hbr 55 47.236 N:159 20.746 W in 16m good holding, a litle swell from Pacific leaked in but OK with W light winds during our stop

Also told about Chiachi island at 55 50.670 N:159 06.480W but did not stop ourselves.

Necessity Cove 16m on gravel (but felt more like mud or sand from chain)56 08.933 N 158 20.470 W we were there in NW 10kn fcast but had 25kn williwaws off mountains, some swell from Pacific, would be not good with big SE swell

Sutwick Island 56 34.962 N 157 14.183 W Sand/mud 12m OK in light WNW breeze, v strong currents and overfalls in pass to north and west.

Agripina Bay 57 06.759'N:156 28.440'W on Mud in 14.5m Sheltered enclosed anchorage apart from a shallow unnavigable opening to the sea that is open to the SE. We imagine this would be no problem unless a large SE swell was running.LOts of bears with cubs seen here.

SE corner of Puale Bay 57 42.9990 N 155 23.8793 W.10m on what felt like a Rocky bottom but when we pulled up it had soft mud on anchor. May be a layer of ooze on rock? Swell from SSE slightly leaking into anchorage but is a lovely spot Only 5-10kn wnd from E when we stopped. THis later proved Ok with 25kn of wind from NE on next day. Plenty of room for anchor to rese if it did move, ours did not.

Geographic Harbor - anchored in 14-15m on mud at 58 06.627N 154 33.869. Bear seen on adjacent beach. At far western end of harbour it is deep and suddenly shallows to less than 1m off the river. Saw bears at this beach from the dinghy and bears on the beach near to our anchorage.

Kodiak Island and Environs:
Nachalni Bay - 57 58.815'N 152 55.632'W Anchored in 7.2m excellent holding in muddy sand. Some weed on bottom but no issue.15-25kn wind from NE and a good anchorage.

Kodiak Town - St Paul's Marina (VHF 12 and 16), on a slip in the fishing boat marina. Noteworthy snippets: the harbour office charges for the days you were there not the nights ie number of nights plus one. If you connect to electricity we were told there is a $US 20 connection charge, another $20 disconnection charge plus the electricity used. We ran our own genset as were only there 4 nights ie we would use approx $2 worth of power. In Kodiak there is an AT&T phone store where a SIM card with wider coverage can be purchased. The first opportunity since arriving in Alaska.Kodiak Town has chandlery,hardware stores, and a marine engine place that can do Volvo, Yanmar and Northern Lights etc See Scott Masden at Kodiak Diesel Service Inc

Kitoi Bay - 58 11.317N : 152 21.720W Depth 18.8m at chart datum on mud, good holding. The RCC pilot guide position is now behind a net laid by the salmon hatchery.Many Brown (Grizzly) bears can be seen here, close to the anhorage and also at the salmon hatchery. The manager at the salmon hatchery, Nick, was happpy for visitors to be given a short tour. Many bear can be seen above their salmon ladder. The precise timing of maximum salmon numbers for each species will affect the number of bear seen. Many Purse Seine fishing vessels were fishing the entrance upon our arrival. It is a good idea to understand how they operate so you can avoid entanglement.

Kenai Peninsula:
Tonsina Bay - 59 18.378 N:150 56.709 W Anchored in 19m depth feels like stony bottombut holding was Ok in light winds for us. We also saw other 10-15m craft anchored in positions 59 18.300 N 150 56.980 W and 59 18.461 N:150 56.545 W. As we approached our anchor position near low water we passed over a shelf at 8-9m depth that extended SW from the big islet in the bay.

!!! Heading NE from Tonsina up the Nuka Passage the scenery in good visibility was stunnng. Glaciers and mountains with many Sea Otters !!

North West Fiord - 59 46.324N:150 02.577W Depth was 22m on clay bottom. Current flows south past island stronger than in the other direction,probably due to water emanating from the glaciers. Beautiful setting.A local charter yacht told us this is the only truly viable anchorage spot in NW Fiord. There are some small ice floes drifting past from the glacers calving. The other yacht was anchored approx 100m to the NNE of our position, deeper but also viable. There is ample room here for 4-6 craft.

Seward - Marina has transient docks with water but no power. There is a floating pontoon fuel dock (diesel and gasoline/petrol). Seward has marine chandleries, outdoor clothing suppliers and a marine engine workshop. It is a touristy town and a venue for cruise ships on most days. The Exit Glacier can be accessed by road. Most of the toursm is geared around boat trips into the glaciated fiords of the Kenai Peninsula. Many RVs are parked up along the foreshore as you approach from seaward.Call Marina on VHF Channel 17 (only low power) difficult to raise them until within 5-6 miles. There are large Steller's Sealions and Sea Otters in the harbour.

Driftwood Bay - 59 54.4846 N 149 15.2470 W. We saw a vessel on AIS anchored here. It was a 14m recreational motor vessel, during light S-SW winds, we later saw the vessel underway approaching Prince William Sound.

Prince William Sound:
Fox Farm Bay - 59 58.042 N:148 08.957W Bottom was Gravel in 10m. Excellent holding and sheltered. Many Purse Seine fishing vessels were fishing the entrance upon our arrival. It is a good idea to understand how they operate so you can avoid entanglement.

Otter Cove - 60 11.210N:148 07.779W Depth 17m, rocky bottom. Otters, Bald Eagles, Black Bear

!!! Chenega Glacier in Nassau Bay - Accessed via Icy Bay. Seals on ice floes and wonderful arctic like scenery. Note ice floes drift into Icy Bay, we only managed to penetrate to 60 14.940 N 148 21.127 W, still some 2 miles from the glacier face, due to thick distribution of ice floes, but the calving was still impressive and the wildlife impressive. !!!!

Seven Fathom Hole off Jackpot Bay - 60 21.835N:148 13.516W Depth 9.6m at chart datum. Bottom rocky but held well and good protection. There are two rocks shown in the channel as awash.We looked for these rocks on a -0.6m low tide and could not find them. There was an uncovered rock close to the left hand bank upon entering approx 8m offshore from the most protruding part of the shore. There was a rocky outcrop closer towards the right hand bank after the cove starts to widen out.Note visibility into the water was less than 1 metre. Saw Black Bears and Otters here.

Eickelburg Bay - 60 55.442 N:147 19.088W Saw a sailing vessel anchored here on AIS

Long Bay - 60 59.459N:147 16.522W Depth 10.2m at chart datum, mud excellent holding. Do not go much north of this position as the bottom shoals rapidly to drying mud. Saw a 14m Motor Vessel anchored at 60 59.334N:147 17.087W, this looked like a more protected anchorage. We saw many salmon, Black Bear on the beach to north plus many Bald Eagles.

Schrader Island - 60 57.519N:147 15.205W Saw a LOA 12m sailing vessel on AIS anchored south of Schrader Island.

!!!Columbia Glacier - Fantastic, we approached to position 61 09.200 N 147 00.807 W and the calving was impressive. We still felt swell from icebergs falling off and if e hull was touching the drifting small ice when those swells impacted it was unpleasant. A tour boat took trippers to a closer position at 61 09.585N:147 01.067W. We were close enough to see the action and launch the dinghy for some photos of our sailboat in the ice. There were clear patches of water at this position. The wind was from the north at 10-knots. There was a constanbt flow of water from the centre of the glacier with a noticeable current flowing away from the glacier. Off to the east side of this flow there was a gentle back eddy and an ice free zone. Sea otters hauled out on ice floes but very shy!!!

Jade Harbour - 60 58.159N:146 59.097W Depth 6.2m at chart datum on mud. The anchorage farther in to the east also looked OK at low tide the next morning. The single rock shown in the entrance on the chart does not appear to be at that position. On a -0.4m tide the only drying rock we saw was at position 60 58.140N:146 59.346W, this is within 20-30 metres of the south shore. Upon exit we passed over the charted poition and had 11m depth at Chart Datum. Otters and seals.

!!Tatitlek Narrows - We traversed from north to south, we crossed the shallowest point at position 60 51.983N:146 42.342W on a course of 104T and the shallowest depth found was 6.3 mtres at chart datum. The chart shows 2.4 metres. The current ran south in the narrows at 0.3-0.5kn during the flood on a spring tide at half tide !!!

Snug Corner Cove(Inner Lagoon) - 60 43.486N:146 38.004W Depth is approx 7.0m at chart datum. Bottom felt stony or rocky but it is level and anchor bit in OK...but would not be happy in windy weather. Sea Otter and ducks.


Snug Corner Cove (off the cottage on shore) - 60 43.824 N:146 39.042 W - Mud 10.5m at chart datum, anchored in 20-33kn SE and veering S wind. Good Holding. There are moorings in the bay, but room outside of them. Outside of this cove in the main bay, with strong SE winds, there are steep short waves running to seaward of the achorage.


Thanks you Simon for this and for your input on the Japan section. We are looking at doing a similar series of passages next season: Micronesia to Guam to Japan to Alaska and then home to BC.

How was your passage from Japan to Alaska ?

Much thanks,

Max
SY Fluenta
12 days ago
Topic:
Sinking in NWP 2018

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Topic: Sinking in NWP 2018
Reply on behalf of Bob Shepton

To add a comment to Dick Stevenson’s observations, this is the irony of progress. I can remember years ago when GPS made its first appearance, my friend and mentor Willy Kerr with his famous Assent, and even a lowly follower as myself, being very concerned. Suddenly people could know exactly where they were and so set off across oceans with a new confidence but without having served their apprenticeship and gained the necessary experience. It’s a Catch 22 situation really because there is no way on the other hand that we could wish there was no GPS. But how to persuade people to put in the necessary miles first? And I had better not start a bleat about Rallies which could also be seen as giving people a false confidence……
12 days ago
Topic:
Sinking in NWP 2018

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 756
Topic: Sinking in NWP 2018
A little provisional summary of 2018 Northwest Passage activity:

- 21 sail boats intended to battle.
- 3 didn't start.
- 1 with no engine barely touched the boundary of NWP.
- Out of two boats heading East, only one reached the way point in Cambridge
Bay to winter.
- 14 boats withdrew
- Only one, German "Thor", a Exploration 52, is still running strong westbound in the Arctic after being beset in heavy ice for 3 weeks in the central Arctic.
- One sank.

I am not aware of any other sail boats.

The year to remember.




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