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6 hours ago
Topic:
Multiple solar panels wired in series or parallel

Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 226
So here's why... (I think... it's close, but any electricians out there feel free to interject...)

Each solar panel is made up of a multitude of cells. Each cell produces about 0.5V, so a 12V panel normally has about 36 cells wired in series - to give a charging potential of 17V. Amps are generated according to the amount of sunlight - but following Kirchoff's laws for a series wired circuit, the current in each cell is the same. If you short circuit one cell, you effectively short circuit the entire cell. Output drops to zero. If you use the same shade area but apply it at the intersection of 4 cells, partially shading them all, the reduction in output will be less marked since only 25% of the area of each was shaded...

For a 12V system, with 2 panels, wire them up in parallel so that if one panel is shaded, output from the other will remain good. If wire in series, than shading of just one cell of the two panels will kill all output.

If you were to wire up 2 in series, you'd end up with an output voltage of 34V - wouldn't that harm the batteries? Just how smart are the solar controllers?
16 hours ago
Topic:
OCC Pacific Rally, Panama to New Zealand.

Nigel.Studdart
Posts: 11
HI Simon,

This may well fit in with my plans and would love to join you. I have a house above Urquharts Bay in NZ and its a stunning anchorage and could make a stop at the end of the trip. Could definitely host a barbecue and a great photo shoot of the boats from my Deck.

I will be crossing later this year from NW Spain in Azura my Oyster 435 and then probably enjoying Central America and the Caribbean

keep me posted snmariner@outlook.com

Cheers

Nigel
1 days ago
Topic:
Multiple solar panels wired in series or parallel

Philip Heaton
Posts: 33
Yes, I was having a bit of a senior moment yesterday-in order for the voltage to remain at 12v they have to be wired in parallel. The impact of shading was quite interesting though. Cheers.
1 days ago
Topic:
Multiple solar panels wired in series or parallel

Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 226
Here's the link to the youtube video. It's certainly an interesting video...

My first instinct is that wiring in series would be a real problem because the voltage would be too high. Unfortunately this couple did not seem to care at all about voltage...

The effect of shading one square of either of the two panels is amazing - dropping current by 50% - I would not have expected this and would love to hear a reason.
2 days ago
Topic:
Multiple solar panels wired in series or parallel

Philip Heaton
Posts: 33
Over on the OCC Facebook page Anne Lloyd has posted a link to a YouTube video showing an experiment with solar panels wired in parallel and then in series, and the effect of shading. It seems to demonstrat a significant performance advantage from wiring in parallel. It would be interesting to get some expert (or even not so expert) views on here as well as on Facebook.
4 days ago
Topic:
Route from Scotland to Norway

Dick
Posts: 376
Hi Bill,
You will have fronts marching west to east so it is unlikely that you will have reasonable winds your whole trip. But as Simon mentions, there are wonderful destinations along the route that can either be planned for or used as bale-out.
We left Lerwick in 2014 with a good forecast with the Lofotons in mind and got headed after a couple of days and went into Kristiansund. From there we worked our way N along the mainland coast. This worked out well for us as we came S by staying more in the out-lying skerries rather than along the mainland coast: both were fascinating and wonderful. This we took 3 months to do heading finally back to Lerwick where Alchemy spent the winter. Then we had another season in Norway concentrating on the southern parts. Its all good.
BTW, Stornoway to the Faroes is merely an overnight and the Faroes are wonderful cruising grounds. The Orkneys and the Shetlands (and Fair Isle) are really special in their own way: sort of a wonderful amalgam of Scotland/Ireland and the Scandinavian countries. (That is probably way too glib, but…)
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy
4 days ago
Topic:
Route from Scotland to Norway

Dick
Posts: 376
Bill Balme wrote:
Toodle-oo! is heading to Norway this year - from the Outer Hebrides. We're planning to sail directly to the Lofoten Islands in June, then spend 2 months in Norway as we make our way gently south.

Are we going in the 'wrong direction' (north to south vs. south to north)? (Feels like everyone goes south to north...)

Any words of wisdom for transiting from Stornaway up to Lofotens? (No, unfortunately we don't feel we have time to stop at the Orkneys or Shetlands)
4 days ago
Topic:
Route from Scotland to Norway

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 799
Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 799
Topic: Route from Scotland to Norway
Bill,
It's a shame you can't stop in the Orkneys and Shetlands as the wildlife there is better than most of Norway.

We did the offshore passage direct to the Lofotens in 2007 and came south via the coastal route. Apart from oil rigs and cold watches it does not present any unusual difficulties. We were lucky to get north westerlies which made for a fast and comfortable passage. Your landfall will presumably be among the islands of the southern Lofotens which are more rarely visited but have good, safe harbours. For the cold I would strongly recommend weezle suits https://www.ebay.co.uk/i/292744059944?chn=ps which I am sure you would find most becoming!

One more thought. If the wind directions aren't quite right then do consider going via the Faroes which, for you aren't much more than a day or two north of Stornaway and would fit nicely with a trip to St Kilda.

I think you will have a great summer.

Simon
4 days ago
Topic:
Experienced person wanted to crew.

Steve.Kelvin
Posts: 1
We are sailing from Kinsale, Ireland to La Coruna Spain at the beginning of June and need an experienced person to assist as this will be part of our qualifying voyage. 36ft steel yacht. General duties, solo watches, sail handling etc.
4 days ago
Topic:
Bora Bora anchoring restrictions

Daria Blackwell
Administrator
Posts: 764
Daria Blackwell
Administrator
Posts: 764
Topic: Bora Bora anchoring restrictions
New anchoring restrictions for all yachts in Bora Boraby Georgia Gremore / noonsite.com 1 Mar 14:25 UTC
New legislation has been introduced to restrict anchoring inside Bora Bora Island © noonsite.com


Restrictions have been put in place in order to protect the environment and the safe navigation of boat traffic in the inland waters of Bora Bora Island. The new restrictions will also assist in maintaining the harmonious coexistence of users in the public maritime domain.
The internal waters of Bora Bora have been divided into zones dedicated to authorized anchorage with specific restrictions applying to each.
Vessels 10+ meters in length or anchorage of 24 hours or more are strictly forbidden outside areas dedicated to authorized anchorage.
The anchorage of any vessel, for any length of time, is strictly forbidden in the navigation channels.
Exemptions may be provided to ships engaged in public service or in a rescue operation.
Delineation of Zones
Zone A - Anchorage areas for vessels with a length greater than or equal to 20 meters.
Only anchorage of vessels with a length greater than or equal to 20 meters is authorized on the following points:
Denomination, Longitude, Latitude, Radiation radius
Ahuna 1 151 degrees 46,121'0 16 degrees 29.246'S 150 meters
Faanui 1 151 degrees 45.449'0 16 degrees 28.838'S 150 meters
Hitiaa 1 151 degrees 44.4590 16 degrees 27.978'S 150 meters
Hitiaa 2 151 degrees 44,051'0 16 degrees 28.223'S 150 meters
Hitiaa 3 151 degrees 43.719'0 16 degrees 28,413'S 150 meters
Toopua 1 151 degrees 46.664'0 16 degrees 31,361'S 130 meters
Vaitape 1 151 degrees 45,760'0 16 degrees 30.838'5 150 meters
Vaitape 2 151 degrees 45.670'0 16 degrees 31,07515 150 meters
Zone B - Zone dedicated to the anchorage of vessels with a length of less than 20 meters.
Only the anchorage of vessels with a length of less than 20 meters is allowed on the following points.
The perimeter of each zone is determined by the reference points indicated by zone.
1. The delimitation of the area of ??Nunue Bay is defined by the following points:
Denomination, Longitude, Latitude
BN-1 151 degrees 45.180'0 16 degrees 30.028'S
BN-2 151 degrees 45.129'0 16 degrees 36.052'S
BN-3 151 degrees 45,159'0 16 degrees 30.109'5
BN-4 151 degrees 45.254'0 16 degrees 30,119'S
BN-5 151 degrees 45300'0 16 degrees 30.097'5
BN-6 151 degrees 45.307'0 16 degrees 30.065'S
2. The delimitation of the zone of Fare Piti is defined by the following points:
Longitude, Latitude
FP-1 151 degrees 45.656'0 16 degrees 29,270'S
FP-2 151 degrees 45.575'0 16 degrees29,322'S
FP-3 151 degrees45.544'0 16 degrees29,444'S
FP-4 151 degrees45.629'0 16 degrees29,522'S
FP-5 51 degrees45.796'0 16 degrees29,571'S
FP-6 151 degrees 45.761'0 16 degrees 29,354'S
3. The delimitation of the Faanui zone is defined by the following points:
Denomination, Longitude, Latitude
FA-1 151 degrees 45.165'0 16 degrees28,899'S
FA-2 151 degrees45.190'0 16 degrees28.948'S
FA-3 151 degrees45238'0 16 degrees28,949'S
FA-4 151 degrees45,268'0 16 degrees28,898'S
In this area, the anchorage of vessels is strictly limited to five vessels.
The duration of stay of vessels in this area may not exceed 36 hours.
4. The delimitation of the Hitiaa area is defined by the following points:
Denomination, Longitude, Latitude
11I-1 151 degrees 44.2490 16 degrees28,266'S
HI-2 151 degrees44,276'0 36 degrees28,316'S
III-3 151 degrees44.324'0 16 degrees28,316'S
HI-4 151 degrees44.355'0 16 degrees28,266'S
In this area, the anchorage of vessels is strictly limited to five vessels.
The duration of stay of vessels in this area may not exceed 36 hours.
5. The delimitation of the Motu Fareone area is defined by the following points:
Denomination, Longitude, Latitude
MF-1 151 degrees42.319'0 16 degrees31..772'S
MF-2 151 degrees42.130'0 16 degrees32,091'S
MF-3 151 degrees42267'0 16 degrees32111'S
MF-4 151 degrees42.595'0 16 degrees31,983'S
MF-5 151 degrees42.585'0 16 degrees31,846'S
MF-6 151 degrees42.518'0 16 degrees31,726'S
6. The delimitation of the area south of Povai Bay is defined by the following points:
Denomination, Longitude, Latitude
P0.1 151 degrees 44.442'0 16 degrees31410'S
P0.2 151 degrees44,520'0 16 degrees 31.618'S
P0-3 151 degrees 44.82316 degrees 31.645'S
P0'-4 151 degrees 44,728'0 16 degrees 31.437S
7. The delimitation of the zone west of the Toopua motu is defined by the following points:
Denomination, Longitude, Latitude
T0-1 151 degrees 46313'0 16 degrees 30,623'S
TO.2 151 degrees 46.343'0 16 degrees 30,942'S
T0-3 151 degrees46.4080 16 degrees31,090'S
T0-4 151 degrees46.5620 16 degrees31,236'S
To.5 151 degrees46.707'0 16 degrees31,088'S
T0-6 151 degrees46.4010 16 degrees30,870'S
To.7 151 degrees46.372'0 16 degrees30,619'S
The delineation of the authorized anchorage zones is available from the Polynesian Maritime Affairs Department (DPAM) and on the website maritime.gov.pf and service-public.pf/dpam.
Access and Rules of Navigation Inside Areas Dedicated to Anchorage
Access to dedicated areas is permitted for vessels in a state of navigation, as well as for those in danger of damage.
Access to dedicated areas by vessels in danger or in damaged condition is only allowed for a limited stay, justified by the circumstances.
Access and movement within the areas designated for authorized anchorage shall be carried out in accordance with the rules of navigation, in particular those laid down in the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea.
Within the limits of these dedicated zones, the maximum speed of vessels is fixed at 3 knots.
Except in the case of emergency, vessels are only allowed to move within the dedicated zone to access or leave an anchorage point.
Declaration of Entry and Departure
Any ship intending to anchor in one of the authorized anchorage areas shall, upon arrival, notify the authorized manager and make an entry declaration by any appropriate means (telephone, fax, email, VHF) to transmit the following:
    1. A photocopy of the ship's documents (registration certificate, flag identification and vessel owner)2. A photocopy of the owner's passport or, if applicable, the user of the ship. Accurate contact details of the owner, or if applicable, the vessel's user (phone numbers, email).
    3. The expected date of departure from the mooring area. In case of modification of this date, a declaration is made without delay to the authorized manager of the authorized zone;
The authorized manager must also be notified of departure.Note: Noonsite is in contact with La Direction Polynésienne des Affaires Maritimes (DPAM), in an attempt to determine exactly how skippers contact the Authorized Manager and the contact details.
Use of Zones Dedicated to Authorized Anchorage
The master of every ship is responsible for ensuring that the ship, at all times and in all circumstances, does not cause damage to other vessels or interfere with the use of the anchorage area authorized by other users.
In case of necessity, all precautions, maneuvers or displacements, changes of location prescribed by the authorized manager, must be respected or executed, in particular when they are considered necessary to facilitate the movements of the other ships or to ensure the safety of the navigation and traffic in the inland waters of Bora Bora Island.
Within the limits of the zones dedicated to the authorized anchorage, the practice of any nautical, aquatic, or underwater activity is strictly forbidden for reasons of safety of the navigation.
Hygiene and pollution
Vessels at anchorages in one of the areas designated for authorized anchorage may not discharge into the water their garbage or refuse of any kind, nor any water polluted or loaded with hydrocarbons, oils or toxic products. Any discharge to the sea is strictly forbidden.
All waste must be deposited in land-based facilities provided for this purpose. The discharge of wastewater is subject to special regulations.
It is forbidden to perform on the moored vessels in the authorized anchorage areas any repair, product applications, or paints.
Removal of Shipwrecks and Abandoned Vessels
All vessels staying in areas designated for authorized anchorage must be kept in a good state of maintenance, buoyancy and safety.
If the authorized manager ascertains the presence of a wreck or a ship is in a state of manifest abandonment or lack of maintenance, and presents, in whole or in part, a dangerous character for navigation, fishing or the environment, the access to a port or the stay in a port, that it poses a potential to cause damage to the ships, to the surrounding works or to the environment, the authority is responsible for giving the owner notice to take any measure necessary to eliminate the dangerous nature of the vessel.
In the event of inaction by the owner of the vessel within the prescribed period, the competent authority shall proceed ex officio with the operations necessary for the costs and risks of the owner to put an end to the risk of danger or injury to the public maritime domain. For the removal of the wreck, the owner of the ship shall comply with the requirements issued by the competent authority.
This article has been provided by the courtesy of noonsite.com.
4 days ago
Topic:
Route from Scotland to Norway

Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 226
Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 226
Topic: Route from Scotland to Norway
Toodle-oo! is heading to Norway this year - from the Outer Hebrides. We're planning to sail directly to the Lofoten Islands in June, then spend 2 months in Norway as we make our way gently south.

Are we going in the 'wrong direction' (north to south vs. south to north)? (Feels like everyone goes south to north...)

Any words of wisdom for transiting from Stornaway up to Lofotens? (No, unfortunately we don't feel we have time to stop at the Orkneys or Shetlands)
4 days ago
Topic:
How to get the best out of the Website and Forum

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 799
Below are links 7 videos I have made in order to assist Members in their use of our Website and Forum.


OCC Website Video - Interactive Map
https://vimeo.com/325524848


OCC Website Video - looking up a Member’s details
https://vimeo.com/325512522


OCC Website Video - How to find Cruising Information on the OCC Website
https://vimeo.com/325487486


OCC Website Video - Posting a Cruising Notice
https://vimeo.com/325377518


OCC Website Video - Forum posting
https://vimeo.com/325301855


OCC Website Video - how to search the website and forum
https://vimeo.com/325746263

OCC Website Video - how to view the OCC FLEET MAP
https://vimeo.com/325743763
edited by simoncurrin on 3/21/2019
edited by simoncurrin on 3/21/2019
4 days ago
Topic:
Tho PROPER YACHT - REFLECTIONS ON CRUISING YACHT

mrsannelloyd
Posts: 6
Hi Bill

I agree entirely with your comment about light air performance. We have neither Code Zero nor an Asymetrical and would certainly add them to our inventory if undertaking another circumnavigation. I made this point in my post on lessons learnt from our circumnavigation.

I also accept that most cruisers looking for a suitable vessel for serious ocean passages are not in a financial position to afford a new build and will therefore be looking at the second hand market. Indeed this is why I believe that Arthur Beisers books are well worth careful perusal. In particular in his second edition 22 of the 58 yachts included as good examples of proper yacht design are production yachts, which become available on today’s second hand market from time to time and are well worth consideration in view of their build quality, which is often of a higher standard than modern versions from the same builder/yard.
5 days ago
Topic:
Tho PROPER YACHT - REFLECTIONS ON CRUISING YACHT

Bill Balme
Administrator
Posts: 226
Jonathan, thanks for your interesting post...

While I have not read the book you reference, I agree with much of what you say - and as you mention, most boats are a compromise in one way or another. One area of compromise is often (always?) cost - and of course, the larger the boat, the more expensive it is to purchase and maintain.

We have a similar sized boat to you - 44ft 35,000# vs. your 42ft 30,000# (or thereabouts) and with similar waterlines. Laurie and I have debated what boat we'll buy when we win the lottery... the same as we have - but new! We would not go to a bigger boat.

Ours is a modern design and encompasses many of the attributes you cite: only two berths, a workshop area, very easy to access all major systems (though I still find myself bent double on a routine basis) and storage space almost beyond imagination! She's also reasonably fast - we've recorded three or four 200 mile days, but plan based on 165 - 170 miles per day, making for intermediate passage times on your scale. Being able to get going in light air is extremely important to us - helped by the addition of 2 light air sails - Code Zero and Assymetrical, which recently allowed us to make passage from Antigua to the Azores at an average of 7 knots with winds most days between 10 and 15 knots from the rear quarters (and motored less than 5% of the passage). I think the addition of light air sails to any old tub is worthwhile!

I suspect most folk buy secondhand boats - in which case, what boat one ends up in is probably largely dependent upon what boats are on the market at the time. While one will search for favored models, that may not always be available and another compromise is entered into.
5 days ago
Topic:
Koopmans design 10.44m Victoire 34 for sale

Erik Snel
Posts: 12
Dutch Rose is sold!
5 days ago
Topic:
Tho PROPER YACHT - REFLECTIONS ON CRUISING YACHT

mrsannelloyd
Posts: 6
Selecting a suitable yacht to undertake serious ocean voyaging or a circumnavigation requires" that a certain amount of informed thought should be given to the choice of this vessel." These wise words are a quote from Arthur Beiser, who is a long standing OCC member and the author of two editions of "The Proper Yacht", which were published respectively in the 1966 and 1978. Both editions provide a very comprehensive analysis of the factors, which need to be taken into consideration, for a yacht to qualify for the designation proper yacht together with descriptions of designs, which in Arthur's words, more or less qualified for the term - 38 in the first edition and 58 in the second. I have a cherished and very well thumbed copy of the first edition, which Arthur very kindly autographed for me, when I met him in the Isles des Embiez back in 1982.

A good starting point for anyone contemplating the acquisition of a yacht for the purpose of undertaking serious ocean voyaging is to first acquire a copy of one of these editions and then make a thorough study of the contents. By the end of this process I am sure that you will find that you will have a much clearer idea of the type of yacht that will suit your own requirements. It is also worth reading what Arthur has to say in his chapter on "The Proper Yacht", which is included in the OCC publication - "The First Fifty Years" by Tony Vasey. When Arthur was asked by Adlard Coles to produce a third edition in the early 1990s, he declined to do so because of the lack of suitable modern examples to include in it!

I would like to think that our Malo 42 - Sofia would qualify for the designation proper yacht. She is a good looking, solidly built heavy displacement ocean cruiser, which has served us well on our circumnavigation. However, were we to undertake a similar venture in future, we would almost certainly look for a larger and faster vessel particularly in light airs. During our circumnavigation we encountered a significant number of couples, who were successfully managing yachts in the 50 foot plus range and in some cases as large a 60 feet. Modern sailing handling equipment now makes handling this size of yacht a reality for couples, who constitute the majority of ocean cruisers. That said, my personal preference would be for a ketch rig, as this keeps each individual sail more manageable in size and provides for more options in the event of bad weather. However, while ketch rigs were once commonplace, they are now a rarity on modern cruising yachts. The exception being the French Amel range. We have encountered a considerable number of Amel ketches on our circumnavigation and I can see why they are so popular with their owners, as they are well put together and designed with serious ocean cruising in mind.

In my view performance is an important factor for two reasons. First it reduces the time spent on long ocean passages. A 3000 mile passage undertaken by a yacht that can average 200 mile days will be 6 days shorter at 15 days that a yacht which can only manage 140 mile days taking over 21 days. A yacht with the capacity for faster passage making is also better able to escape from or avoid unpleasant weather.

Another aspect of design, which in my view receives insufficient attention from most manufacturers is accessibility and ease of maintenance for items, which require regular maintenance such as engines, generators and water makers. On Sofia the Yanmar diesel is located behind the companionway under the cockpit. When we acquired her the only access to the engine was by removing the companionway steps and an access panel in the port side aft cabin. Unfortunately the oil and fuel filters are located on the starboard side of the engine and unless one had extremely long and agile arms changing the filters was far from easy. We solved this problem by fitting an another access panel in the starboard aft cabin, which now provides direct access to the filters. In my view Malo should have installed this at the outset. We also discovered that in order to change the salt water pump impeller for the engine cooling system one had to remove the forward port engine mount! We have now had to undertake this operation four times during our circumnavigation. Needless to say we feel that more careful and thoughtful design by Yanmar and Malo at the outset could have avoided this situation.

A related issue concerns access to important elements of the yacht's construction such as keel bolts and chain plates. In Sofia's case neither are readily accessible. In order to access the keel bolts one would have to dismantle a substantial amount of joinery in the saloon and then remove the forward water tank. Access to the chainplates would also entail dismantling a substantial amount of joinery. In the case of a grounding, collision or dismasting, which are not unknown risks on a circumnavigation, quick and straightforward access to either or both of these elements will be important; particularly as one could be many miles away from the nearest yard or repair facility. We did not address this issue when we were looking over Sofia with a view to purchasing her. We would certainly do so now. While access issues may not be at the forefront of one's mind when acquiring a yacht for ocean cruising experience on our circumnavigation indicates that they are worthy of careful consideration.

Another aspect to which we would pay more attention is the layout of the accommodation and the availability of stowage. We have been aboard many fine cruising yachts during our circumnavigation - Oysters, Hallberg-Rassys, Najads Rustlers and Bowman to name but a few. The common characteristic is that they all have too many berths and too little stowage space for the plethora of equipment and spares required for a circumnavigation given that for most of the time there will only be two people on board. Virtually all had at least one accommodation cabin taken over for stowage use. In our case on Sofia both the port aft cabin and the stand alone shower stall next to the forward owners cabin are used for this purpose.

If one is in the fortunate position of being able to afford a new build most quality yards may permit a degree of customisation in the accommodation layout. In which case my advice would be to trade berths for a proper work bench and purposely designed stowage bins. Few modern designs include a purpose built oilskin locker with adequate ventilation and heating close to the companionway, which I would certainly recommend. I would also focus on a galley designed with use on passage as its primary function and a suitable single sea berth for use by the off watch member of the crew while on passage. However, the likelihood is that one will be faced with or inherit, if purchasing second hand, a fixed layout and the question then is how easily can it be adapted to suit the requirements of a couple engaged in ocean cruising.

I appreciate fully that all designs are a compromise and each potential owner will have their own set of priorities and budgetary constraints. However, I am sure that following a careful perusal of Arthur Beiser's sage advice in "The Proper Yacht" one would make a more informed choice.

Jonathan Lloyd

SY Sofia
6 days ago
Topic:
Best Practices OCC Lay Up Guide

Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 799
Simon Currin
Administrator
Posts: 799
Topic: Best Practices OCC Lay Up Guide
Please find attached the OCC Lay Up Guide.

Phil Heaton has very kindly taken all of the discussions from an earlier OCC Forum Thread and consolidated them into an authoritative guide to laying up a boat both in a warm country and a very cold country. The attached PDF will be published in paper form in the 2020 OCC Handbook and will, hopefully, be on your boat at the end of the season when you prepare your boat for the winter.

The conversations that informed the final attached document can be found using this link: https://forum.oceancruisingclub.org/topic2197-overwintering-a-boat-that-will-be-unattended.aspx

I hope that this piece of work proves useful and we will endeavour to publicise the OCC Lay Up guide elsewhere on the website, eBulletin and Newsletter.

Simon
7 days ago
Topic:
charts and pilot books sought

johnc
Posts: 2
Hi PETER
This is helpful and not ... could help with Brittany and Scilly pilot books but both are on board ... we are currently in Bahamas heading to Azores in May/June ... so not helpful. We also came from Suriname at the end of last year so can provide up to date advice ... we are in the members handbook so email us directly and w can exchange when we know. We did not have paper charts for the north coast of Brazil and Suriname relying on passage charts navionics and our Garmin plotter,
John and sue chadwick
SY Dandelion
7 days ago
Topic:
SSB Radios

Dick
Posts: 376
Dick
Posts: 376
Topic: SSB Radios
Yes, Andrew, No drift and appreciate your reminder of past hx. Always nice to have things in context. Dick
freedomandadventure wrote:
hi Dick,
And its good to hear from you and Ginger, our best wishes to you both.
I think the term clipping in this context came from the action of cutting a wire or two in the earlier radios to enable the operation over all frequencies. In most countries it is legal to use a marine radio in the ham bands but the ham radio specs do not comply for use on maritime frequencies which are tighter spec. Trained ears can hear the difference and hams radios used on marine frequencies are often slightly off frequency.
The earlier M802 radios had a 'clipping problem' which was the instantaneous dropping of the power on a voice peak caused by over sensitive protection circuit. however this has been rectified in later models and repaired free of charge by Icom in the USA. My 802 used to clip badly but has been modified in the US.
I hope i havent drifted.
cheers
Andrew, VK2HBH
Eye Candy VJN2982
8 days ago
Topic:
SSB Radios

freedomandadventure
Posts: 5
Hi Nigel,
If you are in NZ, have a talk to Peter Mott. He operates a maritime coast station and a ham station at his home in Russel. He offers a free tracking service for yachts on maritime frequencies and gets involved with the ham Pacific Seafarers Net on 14300 at 0300utc daily. he is very knowledgeable and operates across both ham and marine.
google Northland Radio to see his website and contact details
cheers
Andrew




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