Boom brake or Preventer?


Author
Message
jgbailey (Past OCC Member)
jgbailey
New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)
Group: Past Members
Posts: 33, Visits: 1
I currently use a preventer rigged from the end of my boom and run to the bow and then back to the cockpit. I am considering fitting a boom brake as it looks a more flexible to piece of equipment use, especially when the wind has got to the wrong side of the sail.

Any thoughts or experiences people can share?
Simon Currin
Simon Currin
I'm into this (367 reputation)I'm into this (367 reputation)I'm into this (367 reputation)I'm into this (367 reputation)I'm into this (367 reputation)I'm into this (367 reputation)I'm into this (367 reputation)I'm into this (367 reputation)I'm into this (367 reputation)
Group: Administrators
Posts: 812, Visits: 86
We have used a "Dutchman" very successfully since 2007. Love it.
Simon
Dick
Dick
I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 682, Visits: 1.3K
JG,
They serve different functions, overlapping for sure, but distinctly different functions. As one who believes the boom the most dangerous object on the boat, I have ours prevented at all times. For offshore we have an end of the boom system, for other times, the boom is triangulated and held fast by a side decks arrangement that also allows some control over planned gybes, but not as much control as boom brakes such as the Dutchman. I do not wish the boom to move unless I give it permission. Please see further the Fleet Surgeon 's advice on the publicly accessible portion of the Cruising Club of America on this issue and suggestions for implementing a preventer that is similar to mine.
More info if wished.
Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy
neilm
neilm
New Member (28 reputation)New Member (28 reputation)New Member (28 reputation)New Member (28 reputation)New Member (28 reputation)New Member (28 reputation)New Member (28 reputation)New Member (28 reputation)New Member (28 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 33, Visits: 16
We keep a line permanently rigged from the end of the boom to a cleat each side of the boom near the mast.  (It is also useful to grab when working on the boom)
​When rigging  a preventer we  take the end off the cleat and extend the line and make fast to a bow cleat, easing the main a bit
Harden in the mainsheet to tighten the preventer.
Most people have a block on the bow and bring the preventer back to the cockpit.  Convenient to release it, but one more line to get in the way.
We have occasionally had accidental gybes, and find our simple systems works.  Perhaps we have been lucky

In any event, I feel that a preventer to the side deck is a bad idea.  Due to the poor angle of the lines, the loads are huge, and risk breaking something​​
​​​​
Dick
Dick
I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)I'm hooked (483 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 682, Visits: 1.3K
neilm - 5/15/2019
We keep a line permanently rigged from the end of the boom to a cleat each side of the boom near the mast.  (It is also useful to grab when working on the boom)
When rigging  a preventer we  take the end off the cleat and extend the line and make fast to a bow cleat, easing the main a bit
Harden in the mainsheet to tighten the preventer.
Most people have a block on the bow and bring the preventer back to the cockpit.  Convenient to release it, but one more line to get in the way.
We have occasionally had accidental gybes, and find our simple systems works.  Perhaps we have been lucky

In any event, I feel that a preventer to the side deck is a bad idea.  Due to the poor angle of the lines, the loads are huge, and risk breaking something

Hi Neil,
Perhaps I used the word “preventer” too loosely as it should possibly be reserved for the end of boom system of boom control which takes the drag of the boom tip if it rolls into the sea when running hard and “prevents” if you will, the boom from breaking and also prevents the boom from sweeping the deck dangerously to both boat and crew in an uncontrolled gybe.
The side deck arrangement I described should perhaps be better described as a “stabilizer” for the boom, especially when the boom end is still over the deck where it often has latitude to “jump” around. The end of boom preventer system is only effective when the boom end is well away from the hull and the preventer gets a good angle to the boom end.
My side decks system’s primary purpose is as a vang: secondarily as a stabilizer. And you are correct to flag concern about boom damage. I have taken a number of precautions to make boom damage unlikely.
To get back to the initial question: boom brakes are, to my observation, not preventers (they are boom movement “slowers”) and present a similar, though lesser, concern, I would think, about boom damage. They make gybes more controlled and thereby safer for boat and crew. But I suspect that an end of boom preventer system for those with boom brakes would be wise for those times when a boom tip might be dipped into the sea.
Lastly, that is a fine way to make the "pennant" of the end boom preventer always available to be attached to the longer line going forward to the bow and back to the cockpit.
My thoughts, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy


GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Login

Search