Quick stop maneuver for MOB retrieval


Author
Message
Daria Blackwell
Daria Blackwell
I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)
Group: Moderators
Posts: 747, Visits: 148
There is a good article in the BOAT US magazine about MOB techniques for different vessels. It includes a useful graphic of the quick stop maneuver. It 's a good thing to practice with crew before it is needed.


http://www.boatus.com/magazine/2012/October/foundation-how-to-prepare-for-a-man-overboard.asp

Vice Commodore, OCC 
Attachments
mob04.png (144 views, 54.00 KB)
Pelagia
Pelagia
New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)New Member (0 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 0, Visits: 1
Hi Daria,
One well tried and tested way to ensure a truly quick way to turn and stop next to a MOB (facilitating a recovery sling) is as follows:

As soon as MOB is given, the helm is fully turned to windward and then KEPT THERE THROUGHOUT THE ENSUING MANOUVRE. The yacht will come head to wind, then quickly through hove-to, to gybe and return exactly to the MOB. I have found this `crash stop ' incredibly quick and simple and importantly the yacht throughout, remains very close to the MOB. I was taught this method over 30 years ago within RYA Yachtmaster practical courses. I am not sure whether or not it is still taught, but during my experiences running the Blue Water Rallies very few people were aware of it. I have encouraged people to try it and without exception everyone agreed that it was stunningly effective. On one of my courses I was given a MOB while under spinnaker reaching up the Lymington river in a solid Force 5. The helm was immediately put up into the wind AND KEPT THERE and although the spinnaker collapsed into the shrouds, the yacht returned immediately to the MOB victim. (Once alongside the MOB the helm is then re-centered and way is taken off allowing the deployment of recovery systems). Forgive me if this is all `old hat ' and fully understood and acknowledged!
Daria Blackwell
Daria Blackwell
I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)
Group: Moderators
Posts: 747, Visits: 148
Thanks, Tony.

That is similar to the procedure recommended by the CCA for short-handed cruisers. The problem in the US is that most courses taught how to do a maneuver with full racing crew. There was no provision for short-handed crew. Hence the article by CCA, which I believe was prepared under the direction of Evans Starzinger. https://www.cruisingclub.org/pdfs/sas_dy_shorthanded_mob_recovery.pdf

On our 57-foot ketch, as we sail double handed, the only procedure that we 've found at all useful is to immediately heave to to stop the boat. Then we can proceed with the rest. That 's assuming that both of us are on deck when the MOB occurs. That 's why our number rule of sailing that we teach all newcomers is: "Stay on the boat".

Vice Commodore, OCC 
Daria Blackwell
Daria Blackwell
I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)
Group: Moderators
Posts: 747, Visits: 148
There is also a really good article here on MOB recovery onto the boat by short-handed crew. http://www.yachtingmonthly.com/sailing-skills/how-an-8st-crew-can-recover-a-20st-mob-31075

Vice Commodore, OCC 
Simon Currin
Simon Currin
I'm into this (238 reputation)I'm into this (238 reputation)I'm into this (238 reputation)I'm into this (238 reputation)I'm into this (238 reputation)I'm into this (238 reputation)I'm into this (238 reputation)I'm into this (238 reputation)I'm into this (238 reputation)
Group: Administrators
Posts: 742, Visits: 86
http://www.nautiluslifeline.com/

Just bought a couple of these great MOB devices primarily designed for divers and so cheaper than sailing equivalents. The Nautilus Life Line is a marine rescue GPS for divers so it is waterproof to 150 metres, very rugged, very compact and buoyant. It can be programmed with an App so that it remembers your boat's MMSI.

When triggered it sets off a strobe, acquires a gps position, sends a DCS emergency message to your ship's VHF (thus alerting your crew) and broadcasts an AIS signal that can be received by any AIS equipped vessel within VHF range. All this for £145 on Amazon. See www.nautiluslifeline.com for details. Takes camera lithium batteries (CR123) with a 9 year shelf life. Hope never to use it.
Simon
edited by simoncurrin on 6/28/2017
Daria Blackwell
Daria Blackwell
I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)
Group: Moderators
Posts: 747, Visits: 148
Interesting on water workshop being offered by the Ocean Sailing Club. They report failures that occurred during the workshop.  

http://www.theoceansailingclub.org/index.php?page=40&fbclid=IwAR0zpOP2ukVcSIfPRd5lN1fcS1ZrFxwbC12MxPdguvhBN79TAWTzKbK7XqU

Vice Commodore, OCC 
Dick
Dick
I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 612, Visits: 1.3K
Daria Blackwell - 8/29/2020
Interesting on water workshop being offered by the Ocean Sailing Club. They report failures that occurred during the workshop.  

http://www.theoceansailingclub.org/index.php?page=40&fbclid=IwAR0zpOP2ukVcSIfPRd5lN1fcS1ZrFxwbC12MxPdguvhBN79TAWTzKbK7XqU

COB/crew overboard thoughts
Below is a recipe for a COB drill that is about as close to the real thing as is safe (primarily for couples, but the format might be good for other crew combinations). Also note that drill gives about the best shot of recovery that is likely on a boat: crew on the helm and prepared and not down below, just talked through procedure, less of an anxiety rush, etc.)
The drill is for 2 couples, but more might benefit. Before getting on board, go over the suggested procedures and talk them through. Include each couple’s COB procedures as they are likely to differ in some details.
Then, we get everyone on board Alchemy (depending on boat size, other couples might benefit from joining and spectating), and we take turns having one person jump overboard in a wetsuit/lifevest or drysuit. Then the partner, now single-handing, executes a recovery while the other couple watches/spectates (and is there to help if needed) while the partner single-hands the boat to recovery, including getting the COB onboard. Then do a de-brief to discuss what went well, what did not, gear that might be added or modified etc. Let the executing couple talk first, then the spectating couple weigh in with their observations. Quite ambitious couples might each take a turn (or the “in water” person might execute a “horseshoe” recovery to get practice.) and if circumstances allow, try for different conditions: say morning calm and afternoon F4-5. Finish off in the future by going after a horseshoe/cushion in varying wind strengths, varying points of sail, and varying sea states.
Then we move to the other couple’s boat and they have a chance to execute a drill with someone in the water duplicating the above.
Doing these drills made clear that Alchemy’s admonition: “If you fall overboard, you are dead” holds a great deal of truth even as it sounds quite harsh. Others make the point that the toerail should be thought of and treated as the edge of a cliff. Even valiant efforts at COB recovery still relies on a great deal of luck in our experience.
Come back with questions.
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy

Daria Blackwell
Daria Blackwell
I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)I'm into this (271 reputation)
Group: Moderators
Posts: 747, Visits: 148
Dick - 8/29/2020
Daria Blackwell - 8/29/2020
Interesting on water workshop being offered by the Ocean Sailing Club. They report failures that occurred during the workshop.  

http://www.theoceansailingclub.org/index.php?page=40&fbclid=IwAR0zpOP2ukVcSIfPRd5lN1fcS1ZrFxwbC12MxPdguvhBN79TAWTzKbK7XqU

COB/crew overboard thoughts
Below is a recipe for a COB drill that is about as close to the real thing as is safe (primarily for couples, but the format might be good for other crew combinations). Also note that drill gives about the best shot of recovery that is likely on a boat: crew on the helm and prepared and not down below, just talked through procedure, less of an anxiety rush, etc.)
The drill is for 2 couples, but more might benefit. Before getting on board, go over the suggested procedures and talk them through. Include each couple’s COB procedures as they are likely to differ in some details.
Then, we get everyone on board Alchemy (depending on boat size, other couples might benefit from joining and spectating), and we take turns having one person jump overboard in a wetsuit/lifevest or drysuit. Then the partner, now single-handing, executes a recovery while the other couple watches/spectates (and is there to help if needed) while the partner single-hands the boat to recovery, including getting the COB onboard. Then do a de-brief to discuss what went well, what did not, gear that might be added or modified etc. Let the executing couple talk first, then the spectating couple weigh in with their observations. Quite ambitious couples might each take a turn (or the “in water” person might execute a “horseshoe” recovery to get practice.) and if circumstances allow, try for different conditions: say morning calm and afternoon F4-5. Finish off in the future by going after a horseshoe/cushion in varying wind strengths, varying points of sail, and varying sea states.
Then we move to the other couple’s boat and they have a chance to execute a drill with someone in the water duplicating the above.
Doing these drills made clear that Alchemy’s admonition: “If you fall overboard, you are dead” holds a great deal of truth even as it sounds quite harsh. Others make the point that the toerail should be thought of and treated as the edge of a cliff. Even valiant efforts at COB recovery still relies on a great deal of luck in our experience.
Come back with questions.
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy

Dick, we are with you all the way. Our firm rule is 'STAY ON THE BOAT'. Yet we need to try if it happens. After all, Coryn managed to save Tony Gooch when he went overboard.


Vice Commodore, OCC 
Dick
Dick
I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)I'm into this (371 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 612, Visits: 1.3K
Daria Blackwell - 8/29/2020
Dick - 8/29/2020
Daria Blackwell - 8/29/2020
Interesting on water workshop being offered by the Ocean Sailing Club. They report failures that occurred during the workshop.  

http://www.theoceansailingclub.org/index.php?page=40&fbclid=IwAR0zpOP2ukVcSIfPRd5lN1fcS1ZrFxwbC12MxPdguvhBN79TAWTzKbK7XqU

COB/crew overboard thoughts
Below is a recipe for a COB drill that is about as close to the real thing as is safe (primarily for couples, but the format might be good for other crew combinations). Also note that drill gives about the best shot of recovery that is likely on a boat: crew on the helm and prepared and not down below, just talked through procedure, less of an anxiety rush, etc.)
The drill is for 2 couples, but more might benefit. Before getting on board, go over the suggested procedures and talk them through. Include each couple’s COB procedures as they are likely to differ in some details.
Then, we get everyone on board Alchemy (depending on boat size, other couples might benefit from joining and spectating), and we take turns having one person jump overboard in a wetsuit/lifevest or drysuit. Then the partner, now single-handing, executes a recovery while the other couple watches/spectates (and is there to help if needed) while the partner single-hands the boat to recovery, including getting the COB onboard. Then do a de-brief to discuss what went well, what did not, gear that might be added or modified etc. Let the executing couple talk first, then the spectating couple weigh in with their observations. Quite ambitious couples might each take a turn (or the “in water” person might execute a “horseshoe” recovery to get practice.) and if circumstances allow, try for different conditions: say morning calm and afternoon F4-5. Finish off in the future by going after a horseshoe/cushion in varying wind strengths, varying points of sail, and varying sea states.
Then we move to the other couple’s boat and they have a chance to execute a drill with someone in the water duplicating the above.
Doing these drills made clear that Alchemy’s admonition: “If you fall overboard, you are dead” holds a great deal of truth even as it sounds quite harsh. Others make the point that the toerail should be thought of and treated as the edge of a cliff. Even valiant efforts at COB recovery still relies on a great deal of luck in our experience.
Come back with questions.
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy

Dick, we are with you all the way. Our firm rule is 'STAY ON THE BOAT'. Yet we need to try if it happens. After all, Coryn managed to save Tony Gooch when he went overboard.

Hi Daria and all,
Since I wrote about COB and the drills I mentioned, something was niggling at me. In the last few years tech advances have improved enough so that I believe that every cruising vessel should have a device that will automatically activate if a crew goes overboard, will warn the mother ship, and will direct the boat to the COB. The device is fitted to one’s lifejacket, activates DSC alarm and the location comes up on AIS to lead the boat back to the COB.
MOB1 has had (and continues to garner) good testing reports. We have had two for 4 years now and have tested it and it works as advertised.
I consider this device a game-changer in COB procedures. It is not inexpensive, but in the scheme of running a cruising boat and in keeping crew safe the expense is warranted and reasonable. And it is far far more of a sure thing to rescue the COB.
I would suggest that those institutions doing COB training continue to do so, but also require their participants to consider MOB1 (or the like if one comes out that competes). It is similar to the thinking of my friend who teaches the use of a sextant to cruisers and has circumnavigated twice doing so. He prefaced his teaching by getting a promise that his students also use GPS as it is so much more accurate and he believes seamanship demands one use all reasonable methods to keep crew and vessel safe.
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy

GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Login

Search