Dinghies and engines


Author
Message
Daria Blackwell
Daria Blackwell
I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)
Group: Administrators
Posts: 749, Visits: 148
Our dinghy has been springing leaks after about 15 years of service. So we've been thinking about a new dinghy and also a new engine that might be easier for me to start and more environmentally conscious. Naturally, we've looked at the Torqueedo. But we met a couple a few days ago who were terribly unhappy with their torqueedo. They said it took 8 hours to charge and would only run for about an hour which was barely enough to get all their crew to shore for dinner in two trips there and back. 

So I thought I'd ask what the collective experience is here with electrically powered marine outboards.

Vice Commodore, OCC 
Simon Currin
Simon Currin
I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)
Group: Administrators
Posts: 745, Visits: 86
We have been using Torqeedo since 2011 and prefer it to our 9.8hp Tohatsu (which we are still lugging around but never use). Yes it takes a while to charge but range has never been an issue for us. We carry two batteries and re-charge of the inverter when motoring.

Range falls if driven hard (as with all electric vehicles) so if you want to go planing around an anchorage then stick with petrol.

The type of hull makes a big difference to range too with inflatables needing more electrons that rigid hulls designed for rowing.

Silent power, lightness and no oil or petrol slicks significant advantages.
Dick
Dick
I'm into this (378 reputation)I'm into this (378 reputation)I'm into this (378 reputation)I'm into this (378 reputation)I'm into this (378 reputation)I'm into this (378 reputation)I'm into this (378 reputation)I'm into this (378 reputation)I'm into this (378 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 613, Visits: 1.3K
Daria Blackwell - 6/25/2019
Our dinghy has been springing leaks after about 15 years of service. So we've been thinking about a new dinghy and also a new engine that might be easier for me to start and more environmentally conscious. Naturally, we've looked at the Torqueedo. But we met a couple a few days ago who were terribly unhappy with their torqueedo. They said it took 8 hours to charge and would only run for about an hour which was barely enough to get all their crew to shore for dinner in two trips there and back. 

So I thought I'd ask what the collective experience is here with electrically powered marine outboards.

Hi Daria,
A lot depends on your cruising grounds. In the Carib or Bahamas, I would opt for a gas fueled engine and a big dinghy: think SUV. There we moved people, dive and snorkeling gear, groceries etc. long distances. The same but less so in the Med.
In Northern Europe, Greenland, Canadian Maritimes, we have been very happy with our Torqueedo (3-4 years old now). Distances are usually short and for wandering excursions we have done just fine and been pleased with the mileage we have gotten. It does have a “fuel gauge” which we have found to be quite accurate.
It does take a long time to charge which I have attributed to it not being designed to draw high amperage. Those with high use might want to buy a second battery (not inexpensive), but we have never come close to wishing for one. It may help that ours is a hard dinghy and easy to row/propel.
I suspect Simon will weigh in as he has had problems which, if memory serves, he has already posted in the Forum and you might find it there. We have had no problems with mild to moderate use.
My best, Dick

Simon Currin
Simon Currin
I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)I'm into this (244 reputation)
Group: Administrators
Posts: 745, Visits: 86
Dick
We did have some problems in the early days but none in recent years. One of the problems of being an early adopter!
Simon
Dick - 6/25/2019
Daria Blackwell - 6/25/2019
Our dinghy has been springing leaks after about 15 years of service. So we've been thinking about a new dinghy and also a new engine that might be easier for me to start and more environmentally conscious. Naturally, we've looked at the Torqueedo. But we met a couple a few days ago who were terribly unhappy with their torqueedo. They said it took 8 hours to charge and would only run for about an hour which was barely enough to get all their crew to shore for dinner in two trips there and back. 

So I thought I'd ask what the collective experience is here with electrically powered marine outboards.

Hi Daria,
A lot depends on your cruising grounds. In the Carib or Bahamas, I would opt for a gas fueled engine and a big dinghy: think SUV. There we moved people, dive and snorkeling gear, groceries etc. long distances. The same but less so in the Med.
In Northern Europe, Greenland, Canadian Maritimes, we have been very happy with our Torqueedo (3-4 years old now). Distances are usually short and for wandering excursions we have done just fine and been pleased with the mileage we have gotten. It does have a “fuel gauge” which we have found to be quite accurate.
It does take a long time to charge which I have attributed to it not being designed to draw high amperage. Those with high use might want to buy a second battery (not inexpensive), but we have never come close to wishing for one. It may help that ours is a hard dinghy and easy to row/propel.
I suspect Simon will weigh in as he has had problems which, if memory serves, he has already posted in the Forum and you might find it there. We have had no problems with mild to moderate use.
My best, Dick



Hasbun
Hasbun
New Member (37 reputation)New Member (37 reputation)New Member (37 reputation)New Member (37 reputation)New Member (37 reputation)New Member (37 reputation)New Member (37 reputation)New Member (37 reputation)New Member (37 reputation)
Group: Forum Members
Posts: 72, Visits: 166
We bought our Torqeedo in 2013. In 2015, the pins on the main connector failed in the rias in Spain. Five things happened:

(1) There were no dealers in Portugal.

(2) The two dealers in Spain at the time, both in the Med, would flat out not repair it. One was willing to sell the part, but unwilling to do the repair himself.

(3) Most gallingly, calling the official service telephone line in Germany was an exercise in bureaucratese. They absolutely said they could not speak with us. They were happy to service us only if we were physically in Germany. As we were not, we were asked to work with the Spanish dealers. But the Spanish dealers would not fix our engine! No, they would not let us speak with anyone higher up. The Torqeedo home office literally hung up the telephone.

(4) The one Spanish dealer mailed us the main cable to Seville. It arrived without instructions. He was unwilling or unable to supply installation instructions. 

(5) Contacting the Torqueedo home office in the U.S. (where we purchased the thing), they apologized for their German home office’s appalling behavior and said there was no manual. Nonetheless, one of their technicians wrote down the procedure. About two pages of detailed, custom instructions. Changing this wire was a bit like changing the spinal cord on a human, only, upside down, from the very top to the very bottom of the thing. One failed little rubber seal and the jewel-like electronics in the bulb at the bottom of the engine will die a silent death.

We continue to use the Torqeedo because it is much lighter and easier to use than the Tohatsu gasoline motor we also carry, but which we need when distances are too long for the Torqeedo, which cannot make the dinghy get on a plane and therefore is a slow solution suitable only for short distances.

s/v Peregrinus
en route, Dublin to Scotland

Daria Blackwell
Daria Blackwell
I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)I'm into this (277 reputation)
Group: Administrators
Posts: 749, Visits: 148
Hasbun - 6/30/2019
We bought our Torqeedo in 2013. In 2015, the pins on the main connector failed in the rias in Spain. Five things happened:

(1) There were no dealers in Portugal.

(2) The two dealers in Spain at the time, both in the Med, would flat out not repair it. One was willing to sell the part, but unwilling to do the repair himself.

(3) Most gallingly, calling the official service telephone line in Germany was an exercise in bureaucratese. They absolutely said they could not speak with us. They were happy to service us only if we were physically in Germany. As we were not, we were asked to work with the Spanish dealers. But the Spanish dealers would not fix our engine! No, they would not let us speak with anyone higher up. The Torqeedo home office literally hung up the telephone.

(4) The one Spanish dealer mailed us the main cable to Seville. It arrived without instructions. He was unwilling or unable to supply installation instructions. 

(5) Contacting the Torqueedo home office in the U.S. (where we purchased the thing), they apologized for their German home office’s appalling behavior and said there was no manual. Nonetheless, one of their technicians wrote down the procedure. About two pages of detailed, custom instructions. Changing this wire was a bit like changing the spinal cord on a human, only, upside down, from the very top to the very bottom of the thing. One failed little rubber seal and the jewel-like electronics in the bulb at the bottom of the engine will die a silent death.

We continue to use the Torqeedo because it is much lighter and easier to use than the Tohatsu gasoline motor we also carry, but which we need when distances are too long for the Torqeedo, which cannot make the dinghy get on a plane and therefore is a slow solution suitable only for short distances.

s/v Peregrinus
en route, Dublin to Scotland

Thanks for that input. In our book, customer support is 9/10 of the equation, especially when we live in the west of Ireland.

Interesting question about whether electric power makes any more sense than petrol or diesel. You still have to manufacture the batteries and create the electricity.

Vice Commodore, OCC 
GO

Merge Selected

Merge into selected topic...



Merge into merge target...



Merge into a specific topic ID...




Login

Search