Blue Water Engine Spares Recommendations?


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Janaki Lennie
Janaki Lennie
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We are trying to put together a sensible list of engine spares for a Pacific crossing. The engine is a Yanmar 4JH4AE with about 800hrs.
The boat is not huge so we need to find the right balance between safety and excess.
Our assumption is that you can ship anything anywhere if you are willing to wait long enough so we want to focus on stuff that is a) more likely to fail and b) can be fixed at sea.
Has anyone made such a list or can make recommendations?

Thanks a lot!

Graham
SV Leela
Bristol 38.8
Dick
Dick
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Hi Graham,
In addition to belts, filters, impellors, oil etc., the big-ticket items I carried for wandering far afield for my 4JH5e included (from memory) sending units and sensors (they are small), water pumps, raw and coolant, starter motor, fuel pump. My thinking on the latter, was these were items that could stop the engine rather than items where you could limp along till you could get help.
I keep my fuel clean through polishing and good filtering, so I did not include injectors or a high-pressure pump.
I also bought a set of gaskets and all the hoses with pre-bend and made sure I could cobble together from spares other hose sizes that exist.
I had upgraded the alternator when I installed the engine and have the original (came with engine) as a spare with the different size belt it would need. I also carry a spare external regulator.
That about covers it: one last thing. I would suggest swapping out pumps etc. under the watchful eye of a mechanic, putting the new ones on and the old but still good one in spares (with appropriate gaskets and fittings). That way there will be fewer surprises when the time comes to do it in some remote anchorage.
I will be interested in what others suggest,
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy
Bill Balme
Bill Balme
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Dick's suggestions look spot on to me. I don't carry the same things, but will investigate now. I considered getting all the hoses, but ended up talking myself into not, after reviewing each one carefully. I do have various (not all) gaskets and I carry a spare injector. I have 4 fuel, 4 oil and about a dozen Racor filters. I also have 3 impellers. I carry enough oil for maybe 3 changes. I also have a small alternator - need to check if I have the right belt for it!

I think I'll be visiting a Yanmar dealer to pick up a few more items this winter - since we have hopes to sail to Patagonia next year...

Getting stuck - even in the nicest places - while waiting for parts is extremely frustrating - we just had to wait 3 weeks in the Azores for a package to arrive. Stuff what you can wherever you can!

Bill Balme
s/v Toodle-oo!

Janaki Lennie
Janaki Lennie
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Thanks Dick,
That is very useful. There might be more questions later but one quick one, what system are you using to polish your fuel?

bbalme,
I understand the frustration of waiting for parts but Leela is a pretty small boat and I have already SERIOUSLY blown my budget so I'm inclined to focus on safety-critical items.


I am really conflicted about the hoses as well. Yanmar recommend changing ALL of them every two years which is patently ridiculous and completely destroys their credibility as a source of information. Mine are six years old now but they all look and feel great. Have your heard of any/many hose failures on Yanmar engines? I think I HAVE to do it - $$$$.....


Graham

[quote=Dick]Hi Graham,
In addition to belts, filters, impellors, oil etc., the big-ticket items I carried for wandering far afield for my 4JH5e included (from memory) sending units and sensors (they are small), water pumps, raw and coolant, starter motor, fuel pump. My thinking on the latter, was these were items that could stop the engine rather than items where you could limp along till you could get help.
I keep my fuel clean through polishing and good filtering, so I did not include injectors or a high-pressure pump.
I also bought a set of gaskets and all the hoses with pre-bend and made sure I could cobble together from spares other hose sizes that exist.
I had upgraded the alternator when I installed the engine and have the original (came with engine) as a spare with the different size belt it would need. I also carry a spare external regulator.
That about covers it: one last thing. I would suggest swapping out pumps etc. under the watchful eye of a mechanic, putting the new ones on and the old but still good one in spares (with appropriate gaskets and fittings). That way there will be fewer surprises when the time comes to do it in some remote anchorage.
I will be interested in what others suggest,
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy[/quote]
bwallace
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[quote=Bill Balme]Dick's suggestions look spot on to me. I don't carry the same things, but will investigate now. I considered getting all the hoses, but ended up talking myself into not, after reviewing each one carefully. I do have various (not all) gaskets and I carry a spare injector. I have 4 fuel, 4 oil and about a dozen Racor filters. I also have 3 impellers. I carry enough oil for maybe 3 changes. I also have a small alternator - need to check if I have the right belt for it!

I think I'll be visiting a Yanmar dealer to pick up a few more items this winter - since we have hopes to sail to Patagonia next year...

Getting stuck - even in the nicest places - while waiting for parts is extremely frustrating - we just had to wait 3 weeks in the Azores for a package to arrive. Stuff what you can wherever you can![/quote]


I agree with Dicks list, if buying staters and alternators there are many available which although not Yanmar make are half the price of the engine manufacturers. The only other suggestion I make is in regard to refrigeration. A black art, but I found we could buy 134a refrigerant in small canisters in some Countries Panama especially. Together with a recharge hose and connections. Once across the Pacific back to first world countries. There are many restrictions on buying refrigerant. You end up using extremely expensive fridge engineers who do not always understand how marine refrigeration systems work. We use the Frigaboat fridge and freezer. And with a bit of knowledge have been able to keep,all,our cooling going at a small price. We have only been able to buy gas once in Italy. Cold beer makes life more comfortable.
Brian. S/V Darramy
bwallace
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To follow up on my refrigeration comments. Recharging a Frigoboat system does not need an engineer if you are reasonably competent.
I used the "Frigomatic R134A charging guidlines which can now be downloaded from the net [color=rgb(0, 102, 33)][font=arial, sans-serif]www.oyster-owners.com/wp.../Frigomatic%20R134a%20charging%20guidelines.pdf[/font][/color]
[color=rgb(0, 102, 33)][font=arial, sans-serif]I now see that there are now many articles available, but this particular one has held me in good stead for many years.[/font][/color]
[color=rgb(0, 102, 33)][font=arial, sans-serif]Note if buying refrigerant ensure it is not for car air con systems as there is too much oil in the gas and it will bugger up your compressor.[/font][/color]
[color=rgb(0, 102, 33)][font=arial, sans-serif]I actually carry a spare compressor on board which will work for the fridge and or the freezer. but I have not needed it, Probably because I have it on board![/font][/color]
[color=rgb(0, 102, 33)][font=arial, sans-serif]
[/font][/color]
[color=#006621]The other comment I will add is in regard to water makers, which are fairly essential for Pacific Cruising. (we spent 4 years in the Pacific) and if you have one, carry essential spares, and understand how it all works.[/color]
[color=#006621]Making a contact at the manufacturer is also good practice for advise.[/color]
[color=#006621]Sail Safe[/color]
[color=#006621]Brian[/color]
[color=#006621]S/V Darramy[/color]
Dick
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Hi Janaki,
Yes, the Yanmar suggestion of a hose change every 2 years is ridiculous. In fact, although they make excellent engines, as a company, I find they are impossible to deal with: luckily, many of their distributors are reasonable and those are the only people I deal with.
As for hoses, I would not go anywhere without the prebends: they are just too difficult to jury rig. I would also not go anywhere without a large selection of junctions (butt connectors and some can serve multiple size hoses) in various sizes as well as a large selection of hose clamps: then if a hose fails, you can cut it at the failure and put on a butt connector and replace the hose when you can.
In many/most cruising grounds, I consider the engine mission critical: perhaps cruising the UK with their excellent RNLI, you can have an engine failure and not be in big trouble (and a few other coastlines), but I would ensure that for most cruising boats going farther afield, that they have the maintenance items already suggested and the parts necessary for the likely failures over the longer run.
Smaller boats and budgets do have a harder time at this, but spare parts should be looked at (as far as I am concerned) as like tools: you just need tools to do the work.
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy
Dick
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Hi Brian,
I agree that buying pumps etc. not from the manufacturer can save a lot of money. But, I believe, you really have to know what you are doing. Often there are a number of variations on the same item. And one can find, as I did, that Westerbeke, when they send their raw water pump include a crucial elbow that does not come when you order the same pump from a generic supplier.
If purchasing in this manner, I even more strongly suggest swapping the equipment in a place where one has access to parts/help.
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy
Dick
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Hi Brian,
Perhaps, this stream could be put in a refrigeration section?
Thought ahead of time should be given to working on your refrigeration system if you are going farther afield.
Refrigeration can be a bit of a mystery and people can certainly make a mess of it, but for wandering off the beaten path, some ability to deal with refrigeration is very handy.
I have only experience with Sea Frost equipment. SF makes things easy as they have Schrader type valves on the high and low pressure sides which allow quick and secure connections to be made by the valve assembly. This allows the refrigerant to be added, something I need to do every couple of years.
Most work involves adding refrigerant. I have used the automotive R134A cans for years. I was not aware that the oil levels were different. I will look into that as an issue.
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy
Dick
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Hi all,
More on refrigerants; maybe more than you ever wanted to know.
At least in North America (the US and Canada) one can buy R134A in small cans at automotive supply stores. I have been doing so for 2 decades of cruising. Research indicates that you can get these small cans with oil added and with a leak sealant added. My info says these two types are not good for marine refrigeration systems: one wants the R134A with nothing added.
Perusal of the small print on my cans of refrigerant indicate that they do not say “nothing added”.t talk about the R134A. You must look for whether the can says “oil added” or “ leak sealant added” and avoid those cans.
I will try to look next time I am in an automotive supply store and see what I discover.
In the meantime, there might be someone out there who really knows…
My best, Dick Stevenson, s/v Alchemy
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